Tag: Nitrocellulose

Multiplexed ONCYTE Protein microarrays Used for Infectious Disease Immunogen Discovery

First, in an interesting Shistotosomiasis study, Gaze, et al, employ protein microarrays in a longitudinal immunomics study for vaccine antigen discovery (1).  Schistosomiasis is a pervasive disease affecting 200 million people a year and traditional drug treatments are ineffective due to re-infection, drug expense, and parasite drug resistance. Non-sterile immunity does develop over long periods of … Continued

A Comprehensive Technology Survey of Protein Microarray Platforms, Techniques and Detection Methods

A comprehensive assessment of multiplex immunoassay platforms and detection methods is summarized in an interesting 2011 article by Chandra, et al, in Expert Review Proteomics (1). The article, “Protein Microarrays and Novel Detection Platforms” provides interesting information for several reasons.First, it presents an excellent description of the emerging discovery and clinical need for high throughput … Continued

Targeted Malarial Serological Diagnostics using ONCYTE Porous Nitrocellulose Film Microarray

Targeted diagnostic serological screening using ONCYTE porous nitrocellulose (PNC) microarrays is currently greatly expanding. Interesting research in the Felgner laboratory at UC Irvine has centered on identifying and monitoring P. falciparum antigens involved in malaria infection using subsets of its viral proteome produced via a recombinant expression system and arraying on PNC. Recently, in collaboration … Continued

Multiplex Microarrays: The Next Generation ELISA

The hallmark of chronic diseases is the production of highly specific autoantibodies (1,2).  These autoantibodies are increasingly measured to guide clinical decision making.    The goal of these measurements is to define intracellular signal pathway activation profiles. These profiles can be integrated with clinical information to generate “biosignatures” for individual patients, the goal of which is personalized … Continued

A Systems Approach to Quantitative Multiplexed RPPA

A SYSTEMS APPROACH TO QUANTITATIVE MULTIPLEXED RPPA’S Presented by: Michael A. Shultz, PhD  RPPA Workshop in Kobe, Japan November, 2013 Porous nitrocellulose film (PNC) is the substrate of choice for RPPA largely because of its extraordinarily high protein binding capacity, which can exceed non-porous planar counterparts by 500X.

High Capacity Porous Nitrocellulose Microarray Substrates Enable Whole Proteome Serology Screening Assays for Antigenicity Profiling of Infectious Disease Agents

Insight into the dynamics of pathogenic infectivity has been greatly enhanced by studies using whole proteome microarray technology [1]. Techniques allowing high throughput production of recombinant proteins representing comprehensive antigenic potential of pathogenic bacteria and viruses allow examination of the degrees to which specific antigenic proteins are involved in human serological response.The true value of … Continued

From Western Blot to Protein Array with Super G Blocking Buffer

Results obtained from Western blots can be highly variable and dependent not only on the specific antigen/antibody pairs used, but also on other reagents in the protocol such as blocking buffer. Not surprisingly, no one “universal” blocking reagent works well with all proteins. Thus choice of blocking reagent should be assessed for optimal results and having … Continued

Super G Blocking Reagent for Western Blots

Although Super G blocking reagent was developed and optimized for fluorescent endpoint detection on nitrocellulose film slides, we have found that it is also an effective blocker for Western blot applications. Data presented below illustrate the effectiveness of Super G blocking reagent in typical Western blot experiments using nitrocellulose membranes by reducing background staining and … Continued

Once around the Block for Antibody Selection

Selecting the right antibody for your application is sometimes like buying a pair of shoes- you may have to try on a few to get the right fit. It turns out that you may also want to walk around the ‘block’—or blocking reagent, in this case, to get the right fit for your antibody.  We … Continued